Israel „Bruddah IZ“ Kamakawiwo’ole


UPDATE: Kickstarter project was successfully funded!

Crowd Fundraiser Last six days of fundraiser for Hawai’ian musician Israel Kamakawiwo’ole on Kickstarter for movie project, and the amount has not reached half the amount. I posted filmmaker Jennifer Akana Sturla’s Kickstarter video on the following Hawai’ian Facebook Groups: H2’O – Hawai’i Bilingual / Hawai’i ‚Olelo Palua, which is where I discovered the connection between the Kickstarter prizes, two vintage tees, with 1978. This was the year the Hawai’i State Constitution restored Hawaiian as an official language. Papa ‚Olelo Hawai’i, where Hawaiian language students and teachers share information and manao (Hawiian for thoughts, ideas, knowledge or opinions) about Hawaiian language. Royal Order of Kamehameha I, Moku ‚O Kapuāiwa, was established on 11. April 1865 by his Majesty King Kamehameha V Lot Kapuāiwa to honor the legacy of his grandfather, the unifier of the Hawaiian islands, Kamehameha the Great. Aloha O Hula, for those who love Hula from Hawaii. Mooolelo Hawaiian History was the title of the first text on Hawaiian history by the Lahainaluna scholars. Total Independence for Hawaii, members can be Hawaiians and Non-Hawaiians in support of our cause. Makua, Native Hawaiian Kahuna Elder, Hale Kealohalani Makua, Keeping the Memories and the Teachings Alive Perpetuates Living in the Spirit of Aloha. The Slippah Club, for those who live in their slippahs. Keep The Music Playing, for independent musicians and indie record labels from around the world to further expose their Music. Aloha Hawai’i, posting all things Hawai’ian. Hoa ‚Olele Hawai’i, friends of the Hawai’ian language. Academy of Hawai’ian Arts, Hula hālau directed by Kumu Hula Mark Keali’i Ho’omalu in Oakland, CA. SNAG Magazine, Seventh Native American Generation (SNAG) is a grassroots media arts organization that provides free Workshops for youth. Aloha Always, Hugs TO You! Native American and American Indian Issues, People interested Native and Indigenous issues. Hawai’i Business Connections, Hawaii’s own „Coconut Wireless advertisement“. Friends of The Hawai’ian Music World, open to anyone who loves Hawaiian music and Adult Contemporary. In Our Kanaka World. Polynesian Dance and Culture Connection, Group for Hula/ Polynesian Dancers. Hawai’i Aloha ‚Aina, a more honest look at Hawai’ian history. Hawaiian History and Culture, Pacific Island Yard Sale, The Makaha Sons, Keali’i Reichel Hui, HAWAIIANS AROUND THE WORLD and You know your from Wai’anae when… are Closed FB Groups, which is where the good stuff can be found.

Official Sites Iz’s notable Wikipedia article states that he was born in Honolulu, Territory of Hawai’i. Iz’s official website is a blog and store that started in Janauary 2009 and was maintained until December 2014. A mobile app was developed for iPhone, Android and Blackberry devices to enjoy Iz on the go. Mountain Apple Company Inc. holds the rights to licensing Iz’s Music. Mountain Apple Co. also has a Vimeo account. There are 19 Iz videos on their Youtube channel. From Mountain Apple Company Hawai’i’s Website, a summary captures Iz’s musical career, along with merchandise and contact for licensing requests. IMDb’s list of movies that licensed Iz’s work. The Hawaiian Music Island, the world’s online source for Hawaiian music since 1995 and whose website is appropriately called mele.com (Hawaiian for song), offers all of Israel’s music in CD Format. Israel „IZ“ Kamakawiwo’ole’s FB page and his Twitter account. Star-Bulletin’s obituary of Israel written in 1997, and documentation with „Isles bid aloha, not goodbye, to ‚Brudda Iz.'“ The Honolulu Advertiser retraces „A late night for recording ‚Rainbow.'“ Even the Deepak’s Chopra Foundation, Dedicated conscious caring shared Iz for their „Music Monday.“ Visiting a grave site means to Find a Grave of Israel „Iz“ Kamakawiwo’ole in Kaneohe, HI.

Online Radio Rhapsody mentions Israel as a full-blooded Hawai’ian and make his top tracks available. iTunes offers an audio preview of Iz’s songs. Jango offers videos, lyrics and free Radio with one audio ad per day. Last.fm is a beta website offering a biography of Israel along with tracks, albums, pictures and similar artists. MetroLyrics has Israel’s „Over the Rainbow“ lyrics and a music video. Songtext also has lyrics and inlcudes his „Ooooo oooooo ohoohohoo…“ Mtv Artist is in beta, yet it offers Iz’s biography; sadly, the author/machine did not bother to research that Iz died in 1997 and at the bottom of their Webpage, it asked: „Are You Israel Kamakawiwo’ole? Claim this page. The Artist Direct’s biography of Israel includes many internal links. Hawai’ian Rainbow, it’s a Tropical vacation for your ears, created a page for Iz with several interesting links created just after his passing. Spotify’s overview.

Chords & Lyrics Music iPreciation WIKI includes the story of Iz’s inspiration to recording of „Somewhere Over The Rainbow.“ Reddit TIL contains 17748 comments regarding „Rainbow“ recording. Iz’s „Kuhio Bay“ lyrics were translated from Hawai’ian to English on Lyric Wikia. GuitarTAB! offers the chords for „Somewhere Over The Rainbow“ along with the lyrics. AllMusic mentions Iz’s nickname, „The Gentle Giant“, and includes a full biography, discography, songs, credits and awards. The UltimateGuitar’s Website contains Israel’s chords, ‚ukulele, tab pro, power tab, tabs, guitar pro and video lessons for 14 „Iz“ songs. Easy ‚Ukulele called Israel the Hawai’ian Superman. E-chords has 17 songs on chords and tabs of Iz’s work. 911Tabs offers 125 chords and tabs to Iz’s songs. Notendownload offers sheet music for the „Somewhere over the rainbow“ and they have an excellent videos on their FB page. Resounds‘ „Somewhere over the rainbow.“ SongMeanings has 59 comments about the meaning of „Somewhere over the rainbow.“ Legitmix also has Mashup of Jason Mraz’s „I’m yours“, Bobby McFerrin’s „Don’t worry, be happy“ and Iz’s „Somewhere over the rainbow“, which was created by DJ Dain.

Hawai’ian Activism Israel Kamakawiwo’ole is Hawai’ian by nationality, not American as NNDB, which tracks the entire world, stated. AboutEntertainment mentioned Israel’s political activism. Honolulu Civil Beat’s „Was Israel Kamakawiwo’ole a Native Hawai’ian Activist?“ The Honolulu Advertiser’s „Israel’s way: Activism beyond politics.“ NPR reports Iz as one of the „50 Great Voices“ and posted three other interesting articles. If you were Born in Hawai’i or are Hawai’ian by parentage, then you can apply to be a Hawaiian National of the sovereign independent Hawaiian Kingdom. There is also the Hawai’ian Kingdom, which also has a regularly posting blog.

Iz Articles in German and French Der Tagesspiegel and Zeit Online, Kultur, Musik’s Annette Kögel wrote an article „Hit aus dem Jenseits.“ Spiegel Online Video posted Israel Kamakawiwo’ole’s „Over the Rainbow“ on 15. October 2010. Sunshinmusikbox OFFline posted on DailyMotion.com Israel’s „Over The Rainbow“ on 03. July 2007. Geboren.am listed Israel Steckbrief. Laut’s biographie of Israel. Two of his videos are on MyVideo. Prosieben listed Israel in „Stars“ of their Star Datenbank. Universal Music Group’s biografie of Iz. Golyr offers Iz’s „Somewhere over the rainbow“ translated in German. „White Sandy Beach of Hawai’i“ was translated. Giga Games‘ Website mentions Israel in six articles, including Melody Gardot: „Over The Rainbow“ kostenlos downloaden vom Album „My One and Only Thrill.“ ELIXIC.de wrote Iz’s bio. NZZ Folio wrote „500 Kilo Hawai’i“ in June 2011. Br.de wrote HitCycling about Iz. HitParade.ch features 175 reviews of Iz’s Music. Ampya wrote about Israel. The Universal Music Group created the a visually stunning website. Cosmopolitan Staragora’s Iz biography.

Imposters & Downloads While Myspace was founded in 2003, Israel has 923 People in „his account“, is connected and 5635 people connected to „his account.“ I expected to see a Mountain Apple Company Video, but I found a „verified“ IsraelKVEVO Youtube videos. Tape.tv seems to have an Israel imposter. „Using BitTorrent is legal, downloading copyrighted material isn’t.“ However, one can see accounts that recently downloaded Israel’s „Somewhere over the Rainbow.“ Search.4shared has 170 „Kamakawiwo“ songs available for downloading. In U.S., items sold on Amazon are a problem for both authors and musicians. Is the situation similar on Amazon.de? Pandora is restricted in Switzerland. MP3Skull.is, download0, mp3ye.eu, makes download available. Matt Holliday’s download. There are too many to include here.

Interesting Miscellaneous Links Iz is listed as a folk singer on Famous Birthdays, with an overall ranking of #11840. The American National Biography Online is a website where the life of a nation is told by the lives of its people…, mentions some details of his early work life. Brainyquote has four quotes by Iz, including „…we Hawai’ians live in both worlds.“ AZ Quotes also has Iz quotes. Billboard’s Israel page includes chart history, biography and articles (mainly name mentions). Kamakawiwo closed its Guestbook section. ‚Ukulele Magazine’s The Wizardry of Israel Kamakawiwo’ole was published 20. May 2015. RootsWorld’s article, „The legendary Hawai’ian singer continues to inspire millions with his music.“ HitFix’s exclusive article „Sarah Brightman duets with Israel Kamakawiwo’ole on ‚Hawai’i ’78‘. The Guardian’s „Somewhere over the rainbow…lies a crock of Gold.“ Daily Kos‘ „Musical Discovery Reprise: Remembering Israel Kamakawiwo’ole“ published 11. January 2013. MichaelCorcoran’s „Discovering Israel ten years ago.“ What kind of exaggeration manages to get in SF Gate’sHawai’i, he sang of thee–and people listened„? KCRW Rhythm Planet’s Israel: Alive and Well in Hawai’i–and Everyplace else. I don’t know what to make of The Independent’s title „Israel is Hawaii but not forgotten.“ Great Israel handbill! Born at Kuakini Hospital. There are many Iz „Pins“ on Pinterest.

Donate to IZ Kickstarter The purpose of writing about Israel Kamakawiwo’ole is to create one place full of the most interesting articles and to inspire readers to support filmmaker Jennifer Akana Sturla’s Kickstarter project. I wrote this less than a week to go. I hope this post is share and donations funnel into IZ’s Kickstarter Project to be funded. Mahalo nui for reading. Be well with aloha!

Hawaiian Documentaries


Sugar Cane Culture Club is honored to collaborate with Na Maka o ka ‚Aina for the HANA HOU Hawaii Festival in Switzerland. Our 30-day crowdfunding campaign rewards support the making of more Hawaiian documentaries and educational videos.

Na Maka o ka ‚Aina are Joan Lander and Puhipau of Nā Maka o ka ‘Āina (“The Eyes of the Land”), an independent video production Team. Since 1974, they focused on the land and people of Hawai’i and the Pacific. They exist to document and give voice and face to traditional and contemporary Hawaiian culture, history, language, art, music, environment and the politics of independence and sovereignty. Over 100 documentary and educational programs have been seen on PBS, Hawai‘i public and commercial television stations, public access cable channels, and broadcast/cable networks in Canada, Aotearoa (New Zealand), Japan, Mexico and Europe. Our award-winning productions have been used by teachers and scholars in classrooms in Hawai‘i and throughout the world, and our iconic footage of the Hawaiian sovereignty movement has been featured in numerous documentaries by other producers.

Their list of Major documentaries include:

Act of War–The Overthrow of the Hawaiian Nation (1993, 58 minutes): This hour-long documentary is a provocative look at a historical event of which few Americans are aware. In mid-January, 1893, armed troops from the U.S.S Boston landed at Honolulu in support of a treasonous coup d’état against the constitutional sovereign of the Hawaiian Kingdom, Queen Lili‘uokalani. The event was described by U.S. President Grover Cleveland as an „act of war.“

Stylized re-enactments, archival photos and film, political cartoons, historic quotes and presentations by Hawaiian scholars tell Hawaiian history through Hawaiian eyes.

Produced in association with the Center for Hawaiian Studies, University of Hawai’i. Featuring historians and scholars Haunani-Kay Trask, Lilikala Kame‘eleihiwa, Kekuni Blaisdell and Jonathan Kamakawiwoole Osorio.

Act of War – The Overthrow of the Hawaiian Nation was one of the first productions funded by the fledgling Independent Television Service in late 1991 with supplemental funding from Native American Public Telecommunications, then called the Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium. It was broadcast on Hawai’i Public Television (PBS Hawai‘i) in 1993 during the centennial year observance of the U.S. armed invasion.

In that same year, the U.S. Congress passed a joint resolution admitting the illegal taking of Hawai‘i and formally apologizing to the Hawaiian people who “never relinquished their claims to their inherent sovereignty as a people or over their national lands.” President Clinton signed the resolution in November of 1993.

The program has since aired on over 93 public television stations and screened at 40 film festivals worldwide.

Awards
Web of Time award, Two Rivers Native Film & Video Festival • Minnesota
Silver Award – Independent Documentary category, CPB 1994 Public Radio & Television Awards
•CINE Golden Eagle
Bronze Plaque Award, Columbus International Film and Video Festival
Special recognition and plaque, Dreamspeakers • Alberta, Canada
Best of Festival, Best Documentary, East Bay Video Festival • Berkeley, CA
Special Recognition, First Nations Film and Video World Alliance, Yamagata International Documentary Festival • Japan
Special recognition and statuette, Aotearoa Film Festival • Aotearoa (New Zealand)
nominated for best documentary, nominated for best of Hawai’i Filmmakers, Hawai‘i International Film Festival

Mauna Kea–Temple Under Siege (2005, 57 minutes): Although the mountain volcano Mauna Kea last erupted around 4000 years ago, it is still hot today, the center of a burning controversy over whether its summit should be used for astronomical observatories or preserved as a cultural landscape sacred to the Hawaiian people.

For five years Nā Maka o ka ‘Āina captured on video the seasonal moods of Mauna Kea’s unique 14,000-foot summit environment, the richly varied ecosystems that extend from sea level to alpine zone, the legends and stories that reveal the mountain’s geologic and cultural history, and the political turbulence surrounding efforts to protect the most significant temple in the islands, the mountain itself.

Mauna Kea – Temple Under Siege paints a portrait of a mountain that has become a symbol of the Hawaiian struggle for physical, cultural and political survival. The program explores conflicting forces as they play themselves out in a contemporary island society where cultures collide daily.

In an effort to find commonalities among indigenous people elsewhere regarding sacred mountains, the documentary visits Apache elders of Arizona who face the reality of telescope development on their revered mountain, Dzil Nchaa Si An, known as Mt. Graham.

Partially funded by Pacific Islanders in Communications, Native American Public Telecommunications, and Deviants from the Norm.

Music by Brother Noland.

Featuring:  Aka Mahi, Pualani Kanahele, Kealoha Pisciotta, Paul Neves, Manu Meyer, Keawe Vredenburg, Sam Gon III, Julie Leialoha, Kahu o Terangi, Kapono Souza, Clarence Kukauakahi Ching, Debbie Ward and Nelson Ho.

Arizona Segment:  Ola Cassadore Davis & Mike Davis, Apache Survival Coalition.

Awards
Documentary award, Berkeley Video & Film Festival
Honorable Mention, Earthvision International Environmental Video Festival • Santa Cruz

PIKO – A Gathering of Indigenous Artists (2010, 55 minutes): Inspired by the cool uplands and abundant reefs of the Kohala district, the volcano deity Pele, the sacred summit of Mauna Kea and their own cultural traditions, artists from throughout the Pacific and Pacific Rim come together on Hawai‘i island to create collaborative works of fine art.

Held in June 2007, the PIKO gathering brought together 115 master and emerging indigenous artists from Aotearoa, Australia, Torres Strait Islands, Mauritius and Papua New Guinea, as well as First Nations and Native American artists from North America.

Over five days, PIKO artists created individual and collaborative works in the areas of stone and wood carving, painting, clay, jewelry, weaving, kapa, digital arts, glass, featherwork and printmaking.

This video was produced for the Keomailani Hanapi Foundation, established in August of 1998 to increase the number, accessibility, and visibility to native Hawaiian art and artists.

This documentary was made possible by support from Administration for Native Americans, Ford Foundation, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Keomailani Hanapi Foundation and Nā Maka o ka ‘Āina.

Executive Producer: Keomailani Hanapi Foundation.

Mālama Hāloa – Protecting the Taro (2010, 39 minutes): Taro grower and Native Hawaiian practitioner Jerry Konanui works to propagate and save from extinction the numerous varieties of kalo (taro), a staple of the Hawaiian diet. Jerry’s mission is also to protect kalo, revered as the elder sibling (Hāloa) of the Hawaiian people, from the risks of genetic engineering.

This video is set to a song, Nā ‘Ono o ka ‘Āina (The Delicacies of the Land), inspired by renowned Hawaiian cultural educator Edith Kanaka‘ole. Written by Kalani Meinecke and George Kahumoku, Jr. and performed by Kekuhi Kanahele and friends, the song praises several kalo varieties for their beauty, taste, fragrance and spiritual significance.

In this video survival guide, Jerry Konanui shares a lifetime of knowledge on identifying kalo varieties, successfully cultivating kalo, and preparing poi. His passion is reflected in the massive turnout of taro growers and taro eaters who converge upon the capitol in Honolulu to proclaim their spiritual connection to this ancestor plant and to oppose any form of genetic modification. They are joined by Native Americans who face their own battles with the genetic engineering of rice and corn. Finally, the same capitol rotunda is filled with the sound of poi pounders as the largest poi-making gathering in history takes place.

This program was made possible with support from Hawai‘i People’s Fund, the Hawai‘i Community Foundation and Deviants from the Norm.

Also appearing:  Winona LaDuke, Ku Kahakalau, Chris Kobayashi, Hokuao Pellegrino, Walter Ritte, Ikaika Hussey, Jim Cain, Manuel Rego, Gladys Konanui, and Representatives Mina Morita, Maile Shimabukuro and Della Au Belatti.

Stolen Waters (1996, 26 minutes): This video documents the battle over the water in Waiāhole Ditch on the island of O‘ahu, where taro farmers and long-time residents seek to reclaim the natural stream waters that were taken in the early 1900’s by sugar plantations.

Shot on location in the Windward O‘ahu valleys and Waipi‘o valley on Hawai‘i Island.

This video documents the battle over the water in Waiāhole Ditch on the island of O‘ahu, where taro farmers and long-time residents seek to reclaim the natural stream waters that were taken in the early 1900’s by sugar plantations.

Shot on location in the Windward O‘ahu valleys and Waipi‘o valley on Hawai‘i island, Stolen Waters explores the significance of the deity Kāne and his embodiment of the water/rain cycle; Hawaiian tradition and law regarding water use; native stream life; and the delicate balance between the health of the streams, the health of the ocean and the health of the people.

This video documents the battle over the water in Waiāhole Ditch on the island of O‘ahu, where taro farmers and long-time residents seek to reclaim the natural stream waters that were taken in the early 1900’s by sugar plantations.

Shot on location in the Windward O‘ahu valleys and Waipi‘o valley on Hawai‘i island, Stolen Waters explores the significance of the deity Kāne and his embodiment of the water/rain cycle; Hawaiian tradition and law regarding water use; native stream life; and the delicate balance between the health of the streams, the health of the ocean and the health of the people.Featuring:  Pualani Kanahele, Calvin Hoe, Liko Hoe, Kawai Hoe, Charlie Reppun, Robert Nishimoto, Kaipo Faris, Kalani Apuakehau, Kia Fronda, Herbert Hoe, John Kilbey and Albert Badiyo.

Produced in cooperation with the Native Hawaiian Advisory Council.

Major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting through Pacific Islanders in Communication.

Awards: New Visionary Award, Mother Earth/Father Sky category, Two Rivers Native Film & Video Festival • Minneapolis finalist, EarthVision ’98 • Santa Cruz

The Tribunal (1994, 84 minutes): In August 1993, Nā Maka o ka ‘Āina spent twelve days capturing on video the proceedings Ka Ho‘okolokolonui Kānaka Maoli — Peoples‘ International Tribunal Hawai‘i, 1993, in which the United States and the state of Hawai‘i were put on trial for crimes against the original people of Hawai‘i, the Kānaka Maoli.

A panel of international judges was convened to hear the charges, which included genocide, ethnocide, the taking of our sovereign government and the destruction of our environment.

During those days of testimony, the Tribunal traveled to five islands to see and hear firsthand the words and personal experiences of witnesses, many of whom faced arrest and eviction from native lands.

The Tribunal judges and prosecutor/advocates from Japan, Aotearoa (New Zealand), Jordan, Korea, Africa, the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Cree, Cherokee, Shawnee and Creek nations brought to the proceedings a familiarity with the changing dynamics of international law regarding indigenous peoples.

At the end of ten days, the Tribunal called upon the United States and the world to recognize the fact that our sovereignty has never been extinguished. It also called for the restoration and return of all lands to which Kānaka Maoli have a claim.

Spoken testimony is supplemented visually with graphics, political cartoons, archival photos and film, aerial shots and contemporary footage of land occupations and struggles.

Music by Kalani Kahalepauole, Jon Osorio, Stephen Brown, Henry Kapono, Ilona Moritsugu, Liko Martin, Helen „Didi“ Lee Kwai.

Produced in cooperation with Ka Ho‘okolokolonui Kānaka Maoli — Peoples‘ International Tribunal Hawai‘i 1993, Dr. Kekuni Blaisdell, Convener.

Partial funding from Hui Na‘auao, Pacific Islanders in Communication, United Church Board for World Ministries.

Awards: „We Are Sovereign“ award • Two Rivers Native Film and Video Festival.

Kaho’olawe Aloha ‚Aina (1992, 57 minutes): Kahoʻolawe Aloha ʻĀina focuses on the cultural, political and military significance of the „target island“ of Kaho‘olawe in the Hawaiian archipelago. The Hawaiian term aloha āina refers to love of the land, the basis of Hawaiian cultural belief that animates the current movement to bring the island back to life.

This video, produced by the Protect Kaho‘olawe ‘Ohana and directed by Nā Maka o ka ‘Āina, traces the history of the island, from ancient times through the years of ranching, U.S. military bombardment and the modern-day struggle to stop the bombing and reclaim the island.

An ancient chant set against sweeping aerial views of the island opens the program as the viewer sets out on a tour of Kaho‘olawe’s historic past. The island’s summit was used in ancient times as an astronomical observatory and its southern point provided a prime launching site for canoe voyages to Tahiti.

The program traces the later history of the island, from the degradation of the island’s environment through the introduction of goats, sheep, cattle, to military bombing.

The 1970’s saw a turnaround in the history of Kaho‘olawe as Hawaiians began to occupy the island, protesting its desecration. Out of a commitment to stop the bombing was born the Protect Kaho‘olawe ‘Ohana (Family). Their visits to Kaho‘olawe for archeological surveys, water studies, re-planting and religious rituals are highlighted by the annual observance of Makahiki, a season of peace celebrated with dance, music and feasting.

Finally the program takes a look at the debate over the future of Kaho‘olawe. An order by President George H. W. Bush to stop the bombing in 1990 was followed by congressional action to appropriate funds for the removal of ordnance and to return the island to the sovereign nation of Hawai’i, pending its recognition.

Featuring: Uncle Harry Kunihi Mitchell, Nalani Kanakaole, Noa Emmett Aluli, Davianna McGregor, Leslie Kuloloio, Steve Tachera, Kate Vandemoer, Palikapu Dedman, Ku Kahakalau, Kealohikina, Attwood Makanani, Kelii „Skippy“ Ioane, Kala Mossman, Lopaka Williams, Malama Chun, Craig Neff, Rodney Morales, Coochie Cayan, Moke Kim, Shannon Lima, Dan Holmes, Capt. Walter Tobias, USN, Rear Admiral William Earner, USN, Capt. Mittendorf, Col.Wallace Campbell, USMC.

Narrated by John Dominis Holt and Ekela Kaniaupio.

„Kaho`olawe I Feel Your Pain“ composed by Lester Bailey, performed by Liko Martin.

Executive Producer: Davianna McGregor. 


Awards: Special Jury Award, Hawai‘i International Film Festival

Ahupua‘a, Fishponds and Lo‘i (1992, 90 minutes): The Hawaiian system of land use allowed access to all resources in the ahupua‘a, a land division that stretched from mountain to sea. Within the ahupua‘a, highly specialized technologies such as fishponds and lo‘i kalo (taro gardens) ensured an abundance of food.

Our Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian) ancestors achieved a rare balance between meeting their needs and enhancing the productivity of the land and sea. Their social system ensured survival from generation to Generation.

In this series of three half-hour segments, ethnohistorian Marion Kelly, whose research into Hawaiian culture was her life’s work, takes us on a tour of six islands to see what our modern world can learn from those who continue to practice traditional ways.

Ahupua‘a Segment Hannah Springer, Chipper Wichman, Bert Sakata, Oliver Dukelow, Clarence Medeiros, Mona Kahele, Abel Kahele, Francis Kuailani, Kawena Johnson, Nainoa Thompson, Colette Machado, Noa Emmett Aluli, Sol Kahoohalahala

Fishponds Segment: Carol Wyban, Kaniala Akaka, Norman Ah Hee, Francis Kuailani, Billy Akutagawa, William Kalipi, William Kalipi, Jr., Colin Nakagawa, Jim Sweeney, Mark Brooks, Kawaikapuokalani Hewett

Lo‘i Segment: Charles Kupa, Charles Reppun, Oliver Dukelow, Keoki Fukumitsu, John Kaimikaua, Jim Callahan, Dan Puilihau, Lieff Bush, Michelle Tenkayo, George Chong, LaFrance Kapaka, Kealohikina, David Sproat, Attwood Alohawaina Makanani.

Produced by Nalani Minton. Directed by Na Maka o ka ‘Aina.

E Ola Ka ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i (1996, 28 minutes): E Ola Ka ‘Ōlelo Hawaiʻi celebrates the efforts of a people determined to save the Hawaiian language from the brink of extinction.

In 1896, the American-backed Republic of Hawai‘i banned Hawaiian as the language of instruction in the schools. As island children were systematically punished for speaking Hawaiian, the number of native speakers dropped precipitously over the following century. Since the early 1980’s, however, the effort to revive the language has grown. Today there are numerous Hawaiian language schools throughout the islands.

This video presentation tells the story of how a small group of scholars and native speakers struggled to bring back the language that their ancestors were forced to give up.

Featuring: Larry Kimura, Ilei Beniamina, Kauanoe Kamana, Namaka Rawlins, Pila Wilson, Hokulani Cleeland, Joseph Mahiai, Elizabeth Kauahipaula, Opuulani Albino, Lolena Nicholas, Alohalani Housman, Bonnie Kahapea, Lilinoe Wong, Kahookele Crabbe, Nailima Gaison, Keonaona, Elama Kanahele, Kekoa Roback, Kiope Raymond.

Narrated by Kalena Silva. Music by Keola Beamer.

Produced by ‘Aha Pūnana Leo, Lilinoe Andrews, coordinating producer.

Directed by Nā Maka o ka ‘Āina.
Awards:
Silver Maile Award • Hawai‘i International Film Festival
Best Documentary Under 30 Minutes, Best Global Indigenous Award • Dreamspeakers • Alberta, Canada.

Islands at Risk – Genetic Engineering in Hawai‘i (2007, 28 minutes): Hawai‘i farmers, teachers, legal and medical experts and community activists share their perspectives on GMO’s (Genetically Modified Organisms), the genetic engineering of crops and the patenting of life forms.

“Hawai’i has been called the GMO testing capitol of the world because we have had more than 2,000 field tests of experimental genetically-engineered crops in more than 6,000 locations around our small state,” says Earthjustice attorney Paul Achitoff. “And this is more than any other place in the world.”

Earthjustice has won lawsuits in federal and state courts challenging the introduction of these experimental crops in the islands without first assessing environmental and human health impacts.

Islands at Risk looks at possible health impacts from exposure to biopharmaceutical crops, both in humans and endangered species. Family farmers express their concern over the genetic contamination of regular food crops such as papaya, taro, coffee and corn.

Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) recount their attempts to prevent the patenting of taro, honored as an ancestor, and assert their right to protect the biodiversity of their lands, crucial to health and survival.

The video also addresses the impact of genetic engineering on food security and the world’s future ability to feed itself.

Produced for Earthjustice.

Featuring:  Paul Achitoff, Walter Ritte, Chris Kobayashi, Dr. Lorrin Pang, Nancy Redfeather, Isaac Moriwake, Melanie Bondera, Mililani Trask, Mark Query, Kalaniua Ritte, Hanohano Naehu, Una Greenaway, Jerry Konanui, Elisha Goodman, Eloise Engman, and Jeri Di Pietro,

Awards:
Best of Festival – documentary • 2007 Berkeley Video & Film Festival
Winner – Farming, Pesticides and Soil category • EarthVision International Environmental Film Festival • Santa Cruz
Global Green Indigenous Film Festival • Santa Fe
Food and Farming Film Festival • California
Maui Fest
Davis Film Festival • California

Mākua – To Heal the Nation (1996, 32 minutes): Located on the western tip of the Hawaiian island of O‘ahu, Mākua has long been a place of refuge for Kānaka Maoli, native Hawaiians.

„It’s the pu‘uhonua for the kua‘āina,
a place where we Hawaiians can still be free.“

Robi Kahakalau

One of the last undeveloped valleys on the island, Mākua has become a home for the houseless, the unemployed, working poor, drug addicts, victims of domestic abuse, the sick and those that simply want to live the Hawaiian lifestyle of their ancestors.

With the upper valley used as a gunnery range by the U.S. military, beach residents struggle to survive in the blistering sun, relentless wind, salt spray and pounding waves. Nevertheless, they prove they can solve their own problems, build their own living spaces, grow food, share labor, clear industrial waste and trash, and even police themselves—all without big government programs and money.

This documentary was produced to try to ward off a threatened eviction by the state of Hawai‘i. The eviction finally took place in June of 1996.

A 1983 eviction at Mākua was also documented by Nā Maka o ka ‘Āina, Makua Homecoming.

Featuring: David Henry Rosa, Sparky Rodrigues, Virginia Bernard, Reggie Crawford, Kaimana Kyle, Joseph & Keoni Victor, Barbara Avelino, Sia Vaana and Eddie Keo.

Songs performed by:
Robi Kahakalau
Mike Kahikina
George Rosa

Awards:
nominated for Golden Maile Award • Hawai‘i International Film Festival, 1996
nominated for Inuwuk Award, Best Global Indigenous category • Dreamspeakers • Alberta, Canada
nominated for Best Cinematography • Dreamspeakers • Alberta, Canada

Kalo Pa‘a o Waiāhole – Hard Taro of Waiāhole (1995, 59 minutes): This program explores the issues surrounding the allocation of water that flows in the Waiāhole Ditch on the island of O‘ahu. The title comes from an old saying referring to the stubbornness of the people of Waiāhole valley. This program documents their determination to regain the water that was taken from windward streams in the early 1900’s to irrigate sugar plantations on the drier leeward side.

Stream ecosystems are seen close up during a visit to Waiāhole stream with two young Hawaiians who discover ‘ōpae, a native shrimp. The special qualities of the ‘o‘opu (goby) are studied by aquatic biologists at Hakalau stream on Hawai‘i island, while ocean fishermen describe the important connection between the health of the streams and that of the surrounding coastal areas.

The link between water and the cultivation of taro, the staple food of Native Hawaiians, is brought out through a historical look at what happened to the windward valleys, streams and communities in 1916 when the Waiāhole Ditch first began to transport water to leeward sugar plantations. Today’s taro growers call for returning the water so that the extensive agricultural systems developed by earlier Hawaiians can once again produce food for local residents.

But developers want the ditch water for golf courses and commercial and resort development. Issues such as limits to growth, sewage recycling and preserving family-based agriculture are addressed by community members and public officials alike.

Native Hawaiian tradition regarding the use of water are presented as a background to understanding contemporary law and recent court rulings.

Appearing: Kia Fronda, Calvin Hoe, Charlene Hoe, Liko Hoe, Kaipo Faris, Charlie Reppun, Robert Nishimoto, Bryson Fernandez, Albert Badiyo, Marion Kelly, Nohealani Wallace, Kalani Apuakehau, Katherine Vandemoer, Jim Anthony.

Also: Kawai Hoe, Kala Hoe, Kamaehu Apuakehau, Tommy Young, Kinau Kamali’i, Lilikala Kame‘eleihiwa, Ipo Tano, Eric Enos, Guy Nakamoto, Herbert Hoe, Meala Bishop, George Hudes, John Reppun, Denise Antolini, Ira Rohter, David Martin, Robert Nakata, John Kilbey, Jimmy Todd, Zun Ibaca, Consortia Basan, Arlene Eaton, Rodolfo Ramos, Yukio Kitagawa, Bruce Anderson, Jack Keppeler, Chester Lao, William Paty, Herman Lemke, George Hiu, Rae Loui, Kanamu Kanekoa, Nicole McInerny, Bert Hatton, Ron Albu, Ed Sakoda, James Nakatani, Michael Wilson, Jade Moon, Angela Keen, Marvin Buenconsejo.

Produced by Nā Maka o ka ‘Āina
in association with the Native Hawaiian Advisory Council.

Executive Producer: Elizabeth Ho’oipo Pa
Music by Peter Medeiros
Still photographs: Anne Kapulani Landgraf

This program explores the issues surrounding the allocation of water that flows in the Waiāhole Ditch on the island of O‘ahu. The title comes from an old saying referring to the stubbornness of the people of Waiāhole valley. This program documents their determination to regain the water that was taken from windward streams in the early 1900’s to irrigate sugar plantations on the drier leeward side.

Stream ecosystems are seen close up during a visit to Waiāhole stream with two young Hawaiians who discover ‘ōpae, a native shrimp. The special qualities of the ‘o‘opu (goby) are studied by aquatic biologists at Hakalau stream on Hawai‘i island, while ocean fishermen describe the important connection between the health of the streams and that of the surrounding coastal areas.The link between water and the cultivation of taro, the staple food of Native Hawaiians, is brought out through a historical look at what happened to the windward valleys, streams and communities in 1916 when the Waiāhole Ditch first began to transport water to leeward sugar plantations. Today’s taro growers call for returning the water so that the extensive agricultural systems developed by earlier Hawaiians can once again produce food for local residents.

But developers want the ditch water for golf courses and commercial and resort development. Issues such as limits to growth, sewage recycling and preserving family-based agriculture are addressed by community members and public officials alike.

Native Hawaiian tradition regarding the use of water are presented as a background to understanding contemporary law and recent court rulings.

Appearing: Kia Fronda, Calvin Hoe, Charlene Hoe, Liko Hoe, Kaipo Faris, Charlie Reppun, Robert Nishimoto, Bryson Fernandez, Albert Badiyo, Marion Kelly, Nohealani Wallace, Kalani Apuakehau, Katherine Vandemoer, Jim Anthony.

Also: Kawai Hoe, Kala Hoe, Kamaehu Apuakehau, Tommy Young, Kinau Kamali’i, Lilikala Kame‘eleihiwa, Ipo Tano, Eric Enos, Guy Nakamoto, Herbert Hoe, Meala Bishop, George Hudes, John Reppun, Denise Antolini, Ira Rohter, David Martin, Robert Nakata, John Kilbey, Jimmy Todd, Zun Ibaca, Consortia Basan, Arlene Eaton, Rodolfo Ramos, Yukio Kitagawa, Bruce Anderson, Jack Keppeler, Chester Lao, William Paty, Herman Lemke, George Hiu, Rae Loui, Kanamu Kanekoa, Nicole McInerny, Bert Hatton, Ron Albu, Ed Sakoda, James Nakatani, Michael Wilson, Jade Moon, Angela Keen, Marvin Buenconsejo.

Produced by Nā Maka o ka ‘Āina
in association with the Native Hawaiian Advisory Council.

Executive Producer: Elizabeth Ho’oipo Pa
Music by Peter Medeiros
Still photographs: Anne Kapulani Landgraf

Awards:
Silver Maile Award
Hawai’i International Film Festival, 1996

The Caretakers of Ka Lae (2002, 48 minutes): The story of a Hawaiian family who made a home at Ka Lae (South Point), a remote and rugged area at the southernmost tip of the island of Hawai‘i.

For eleven years, under threat of eviction by the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands, the Viernes family remained committed to caring for and preserving the sacred and historic sites of Ka Kae.

In this video, the family shares their knowledge of the archaeological sites, including a heiau built in the 4th century, a habitation cave, canoe mooring holes and ancient burial sites. Unique land features such as the bottomless Lua Palahemo brackish water pond with its unique species of ‘ōpae, Mahana green sand beach and the magnificent Ka Lae cliffs are also featured, along with endangered plants such as the ’ōhai.

The family demonstrates how to live off the land by catching fish and growing food. They also describe their efforts to provide an annual month-long summer cultural immersion experience for the children of Ka‘ū, and lay out a vision for the future care and management of Ka Lae.

The family was evicted by the Dept. of Hawaiian Home Lands in 2007.

Featuring: Wiliama Viernes (Keawe Poepoe), Melody Leimomi Ai Viernes, Jashua Viernes, Ekolu Viernes.

Following the program is a music video of the song Every Child a Promise, performed by Robi Kahakalau and written by E. Doodie Cruz.

Pele’s Appeal (1989, 30 minutes): In the swirling volcanic steam and misty rain forest of KĪlauea volcano’s east rift zone on the island of Hawai‘i, two forces meet head on. Geothermal development interests, seeking to clear the rain forest for drilling operations, are opposed by native Hawaiians seeking to stop the desecration of the fire goddess, Pele.

Pele is a living deity fundamental to Hawaiian spiritual belief. She is the eruption, with its heat, lava and steam. Her family takes the form of forest plants, animals and other natural forces. But geothermal development interests see Pele as simply a source of electricity.

When Hawaiians take the issue to court, they find that nature-based religions are not respected by U.S. law. Adding to the issue are environmental concerns over the threat to native species of plants and birds in an island group that is the world capitol for extinct and endangered species. The fact that the geothermal wells are situated on one of the most geologically unstable areas of the planet leads to safety concerns for the surrounding residential communities.

Thus the stage is set for one of the most controversial issues ever to rock Hawai‘i, an eruption exceeded only by that of Pele, who has been dancing on the east rift zone since the controversy began in 1983.

Produced for the Pele Defense Fund as an appeal for help to stop geothermal test drilling in the Wao Kele o Puna rainforest.

Featuring: Palikapu Dedman, Pua Kanahele, Noa Emmett Aluli, Henry Auwae, Davianna McGregor, Paul Takehiro, Tom Luebben, Alapai Hanapi, and Kaolelo Ulaleo.

Awards: Best Political Film of the 1990 Hawai’i International Film Festival • Political Film Society

Kapu Ka‘ū (1988, 1 hour): Kapu Kaʻū is a unique portrait of one of Hawai‘i’s most remote and rugged districts, Ka‘ū, located on the southern flanks of Mauna Loa on the island of Hawai‘i. The people of Ka‘ū, known historically for their independence and resilience, relate stories of a lifestyle closely tied to the land and the sea.

Viewers are guided through the verdant uplands by long-time elders who recall traditions of growing taro, hunting pig and branding cattle at Kapāpala Ranch. A tour of the shoreline by area residents reveals ice cold freshwater ponds at Nīnole, rich fishing grounds at Punalu‘u, salt gathering areas at Kamilo, green sea turtles and the famous ʻiliʻili stones of Kōloa.

Ka Lae, also known as South Point, the southernmost point in the Hawaiian islands, is famous for its ancient sites: Kalalea heiau, canoe mooring holes, habitation caves, burial grounds and house foundations. It is an area honored by Maori tribes as the departure point for voyages to Aotearoa (New Zealand) centuries ago.

In spite of the beauty and special significance of this district, it has been impacted by many outside influences, from hundred-year-old sugar plantations to modern-day resort and spaceport development plans. Kapu Ka‘ū shows the determination and continuing efforts by residents to keep Ka‘ū kapu, or sacred.

Featuring: Palikapu Dedman, Adeline Andrade, Pele Hanoa, George Manuel, John and Chris Kalani, Sam Kaluna, Chris Bangay, Lono Ke, David Kanakaole, Minerva Akiu, Caroline and Joe Kauwe, Hanoa Paaluhi, Sam Hui, Bernard Keliikoa, Archie Kaawa, Lily and William Ahia and John Wailani.

The program was produced by Nā Maka o ka ‘Āina in association with Ka ‘Ohana o Ka Lae („the family of Ka Lae”).

Mākua Homecoming (1983, 25 minutes): Kānaka Maoli (native Hawaiians) living at Mākua beach in 1983  take a stand to resist eviction by police and government agents.

During the process, they learn the history of how they became dispossessed of their lands and government. The event was one of numerous evictions and land rights actions that took place in the 1970s and 1980s.

Featuring: Poka Laenui, Eddie Pihana, Stella Pihana, Irene „Tiny“ Maynard, Rocky Naeole, Kawehi Kanui, Sam Mahiai, Kuumealoha Gomes, and Elaine Keliiheleua.